Emerging Emulation Tools for Low-carbon Energy systems

Emerging Emulation Tools for Low-carbon Energy systems

This tutorial will introduce the audience to Real-Time Simulation of Power Systems, including Distribution, Transmission and Microgrids. The audience will learn about applications widely used across academia and industry to facilitate Research & Development, Product Development and System Configuration/Testing. These include Hardware-in-the-Loop, Power Hardware-in-the-Loop, Rapid Control Prototyping, and Software-in-the-Loop testing. The tutorial will then cover Real-Time Simulation fundamentals with focus on hardware and solvers required to perform such work. Afterwards, the tutorial will shift to more specific application areas including Wide Area Monitoring Protection and Control, Protection systems testing, Microgrid Controller testing, Multi-Level Modular Converter (MMC) simulation, and power electronics simulation. Also, approaches to communication network simulation, including cybersecurity and vulnerability of operational technology, will be presented. At the end of the tutorial, the audience should have a very good understanding of this powerful tool and how it can be used to benefit their work on the modern power grid.

 

Instructors:

Thomas Kirk is a senior solutions engineer with OPAL-RT Technologies based out of Vancouver, BC, Canada. Since 2015, he has worked closely with world leaders within the energy, aerospace, defense and academic sectors in selecting real-time testing solutions for R&D, production and certification purposes. Also, he is OPAL-RT’s specialist in creating test setups for cybersecurity and vulnerability of grid operational technology, as well as Power Hardware-in-the-Loop. Prior to OPAL-RT, he worked at Bechtel Corporation at the Aluminum Center of Excellence (ACE) in Montreal, on simulating the performance and safety of mining facilities during the design phase. He has his Master’s in Applied Science from the University of Waterloo (2014) and his Bachelors in Engineering from McGill University (2010).

 

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